Civil Society and the Internet in Japan (Routledge Contemporary Japan)


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Cultural and Social Perspectives, 1st Edition

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Sign In. Advanced Search. Article Navigation. Close mobile search navigation Article Navigation. Volume Can be reached by e-mail at tyamaguchi montana. Oxford Academic. Google Scholar. Jump to: Biography Researcher's projects Student projects Publications. Research interests Grassroots movements and survival politics in Northeast Asia; the Korean War in regional context; border controls and migration in East Asia; national identity and ethnic minorities in Japan; modern Japanese historiography; human rights in Asia; globalization processes with particular reference to Northeast Asia ; memory and reconciliation in Northeast Asia; the Japanese in wartime Australia; the Fukushima nuclear accident in social and historical context.

Morris-Suzuki, T , 'Re-animating a radioactive landscape: informal life politics in the wake of the Fukushima nuclear disaster', Japan Forum , vol. Morris-Suzuki, T, ed.


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Morris-Suzuki, T , 'Kumgangsan [Mt. Sungkyun Journal of East Asian Studies. Vol 9, Issue 22 No 2. May Morris-Suzuki, , "Kumgangsan" Mt.

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Tessa Morris-Suzuki. Vol 9, Issue 8 No 3. February They are probative of illicit public sex, and the making and display of these images was also unlawful in Japan. What Yoshiyuki says here about the law is entirely untrue. It was illegal to have sex in the park, it was illegal to watch couples having sex in the park, it was illegal to photograph them, and it was also illegal to display or distribute those photographs.

Fictional explorations of Japanese sexuality were transformed during the Meiji period , away from descriptive erotic writing towards a narrative that revealed interiority and identity. Yokota-Murakami wrote:. Yoshiyuki and Araki, in their conversation, appear not to observe these distinctions, conflating the voyeur, the peeper, the photographer, the innovator and the pervert.

It shows your shadow.

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Araki: Maybe everybody will be doing it by this summer, once word about the Sunpak flash unit spreads. Araki: Lechers are the only hope for the twenty-first century. Only lechers come up with good ideas.


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Only lechers take good photographs. So are you one too? Scholars differ in their views about Japanese attitudes to public sex. McLelland writes that public displays of affection were introduced to Japan by American soldiers after the Second World War, [39] and that American GIs sought out sex in public parks, [40] practices which were policed by US military patrols and ignored by Japanese police.

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The notion that a space can be both public and hidden is powerful in the context of a jurisprudence in which intimate secrets are disclosed as an act of justice. One interpretation of his chosen title, then, is that he is inviting his images to be seen as transgressions, its subjects issuing wilful challenges to public authority. However the scholarship of Cassegard, McLelland and others demonstrates that there is a legitimate alternative way of imagining these public intimacies, one that does not demand sanction for transgression, or more precisely, one that does not require transgression to be exhibited and judged as transgressive.

The sense of the breached sanctuary, the shameful disclosure, the thrilling revelation, these are also the effects of some acts of open justice, revealing the pleasure in seeing a secret that has fallen out of place. It is important to distinguish these effects on a spectrum of pleasure; not all voyeurisms are equal.

Residents living permanently in Japan's cyber-cafés - Lost in Manboo

The voyeur who hides behind a tree to watch might be engaged in a distinct category of behaviour, and the magazine reader, the photographer, or the gallery visitor enjoys a different kind of looking, and not all of them actively sought out the pleasure they received. Voyeurism demands an element of display, and voyeurs observe from a safe distance, although that distance varies. Decency and propriety might be preserved for the voyeur; they may experience the thrill of transgressing a boundary without necessarily crossing a line.

Are the voyeurs content merely to watch, or are they active participants in these public sex acts? In an email interview with Philip Gefter of the New York Times , Yoshiyuki gave his own account of the practices he documented, one which suggestively refuses to resolve ambiguity:. The couples were not aware of the voyeurs in most cases. The voyeurs try to look at the couple from a distance at the beginning, then slowly approach toward the couple behind the bushes, and from the blind spots of the couple they try to come as close as possible, and finally peep from a very close distance.

But sometimes there are the voyeurs who try to touch the woman, and gradually escalating — then trouble would happen. Araki: They are amazing - because they are really screwing. Look at him giving it to her! You need a lot of nerve to take photographs like these. At Shinjuku Gyoen park, for instance, the women are always on top.

Civil Society and the Internet in Japan

Yoshiyuki: I saw that sometimes, too. For a jurisprudence of sensitivity, tact or restraint are crucial practices. In a regime of open justice, in the face of demands for disclosure, the law ought always to be attentive to the need, at times, for withholding.


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Responses to Yoshiyuki from Western critics have focused less upon the artist himself — likely because he has worked under a pseudonym and given very few interviews — and more upon the work itself. Whereas some viewers have recognised his work as emerging from a Japanese tradition, and some have seen his work as a commentary upon Japanese socio-sexual mores, most have sought to equate Yoshiyuki with Western practitioners of candid photography, and to identify his work as responding to contemporary Western preoccupations with privacy, surveillance and voyeurism.

Jennifer Ray has compared Yoshiyuki with Minor White and Evergon, both of whom documented aspects of gay sexuality, and particularly gay cruising. More likely, given the contemporary Western fascination with surveillance, technology and identity, they were skilfully released at precisely the right moment to dilute a relatively toxic discourse — permeated by fears about state secrets, terrorists, total surveillance and the end of privacy — with a charming and surprising series of photographs from s Tokyo parks after dark.

Civil Society and the Internet in Japan (Routledge Contemporary Japan) Civil Society and the Internet in Japan (Routledge Contemporary Japan)
Civil Society and the Internet in Japan (Routledge Contemporary Japan) Civil Society and the Internet in Japan (Routledge Contemporary Japan)
Civil Society and the Internet in Japan (Routledge Contemporary Japan) Civil Society and the Internet in Japan (Routledge Contemporary Japan)
Civil Society and the Internet in Japan (Routledge Contemporary Japan) Civil Society and the Internet in Japan (Routledge Contemporary Japan)
Civil Society and the Internet in Japan (Routledge Contemporary Japan) Civil Society and the Internet in Japan (Routledge Contemporary Japan)
Civil Society and the Internet in Japan (Routledge Contemporary Japan) Civil Society and the Internet in Japan (Routledge Contemporary Japan)
Civil Society and the Internet in Japan (Routledge Contemporary Japan) Civil Society and the Internet in Japan (Routledge Contemporary Japan)
Civil Society and the Internet in Japan (Routledge Contemporary Japan) Civil Society and the Internet in Japan (Routledge Contemporary Japan)

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